Lohrman’s Map of the Moon

Cartographer: Wilhelm Lohrman

Title: Topographie der sichtbaren Mondoberflaeche (Topography of the Visible Lunar Surface) Dresden: Auf Kosten des Verfassers, 1824.

25 sheets, hachure relief visualization and multiple gray shadings for albedo

1824 4 sheets

Size  227 × 227 mm

1878 Full atlas published by Julius Schmidt, reissued in  1892  Mondkarte in 25 Sectionen und 2 Erl uterungstafeln /Herausgegeben von Dr. J.F.Julius Schmidt. — Leipzig: Verlag von Johann Ambrosius Barth (Arthur Meiner),1892.

Originals:

 

“Lohrmann was a professional cartographer and surveyor who undertook a lunar map based on his own micrometric measurements. Using a small Fraunhofer refractor, he determined the exact position of a number of control points on the moon, from which the positions of all other lunar features could be determined. He divided his map into 25 sections, and in 1824 he published the first four of these sections, along with an explanation of his methods. Although he worked for sixteen more years, and finished drawing all the sections, Lohrmann never did publish the remainder of the atlas. Fortunately, his great successor Julius Schmidt undertook to have the drawings engraved, and the complete Lohrmann atlas finally saw the light in 1878” (Source)

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Image source

 

 

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The System of Lunar Craters (1963-1966)

Reference map showing IAU nomenclature, south-up, orthographic projection.

Arthur DWG, Agnieray AP, Horvath RA, Wood CA, Chapman CR 1963 The System of Lunar Craters, Quadrant I. Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 2 (30).

Published in Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory 30, 40,50,70, 1963-66

Quadrant I

Quadrant II

Quadrant IV

Also available in the Moon Wiki

 

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Legend (A2 sheet) (Source)

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Wilkins’ maps of the Moon

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Photo: LPOD Sep15 2008.

Cartographer: H Percy Wilkins, “the last traditional selenographer”

Editions: Early edition with hand lettering, later editions with sans serif and grid.

South-up orientation. Orthographic projection.

60 inch map: 1924

200 inch map: 1930

300 inch map of the Moon First edition, 1946.  Third edition, 1951, revisions in 1952, 1954.

25 map sheets, Scale 21.6 miles per inch.

Compiled from personal observations starting in 1909.

1938-505

200-inch edition

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300-inch edition including polar and far side views. This image is compiled by H. Hargitai from the Strolling Astronomer publication (100 inch reduction).

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A single sheet from the 200-inch edition.

 

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The 300-inch edition with north-up orientation. Neil Armstrong and Dr H P Wilkins  at the Royal Geographical Society, London. (source)

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Reduced edition 1952 (?) (Source)

 

 

Map of the Moon, Swiss World Atlas (2016)

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Topographic map of the Moon

Three languages in the three language variants of the Swiss World Atlas (German, French, Italian)

Projection: Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection

Scale: 1:34,117,800

Cartographer: Stephan Wondrak

Publisher: Institut für Kartografie und Geoinformation, ETH Zürich,

Atlas Editor: Lorenz Hurni

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Website: https://schweizerweltatlas.ch/listings/2121/

Atlas świata / Map of the Moon (1967)

Publication: Pergamon World Atlas. Pergamon Press. P.W.N. – Poland. Polish-Scientific Publishers. Warszawa. 1968. The English, civilian version of the Polish world atlas.

Cartographer: Wojskowe Zaklady Kartograficzne / Polish Army Topography Service

Page size: 40×32

Copies: 205,000 in Polish and 37,000 in English

The Lunar map shows the far side of the Moon based on the interpretation of the first Soviet photographs and includes the infamous “Soviet Range” that was misinterpreted as a mountain.

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